Steven Greenhouse

Steven Greenhouse was a reporter at The New York Times for 31 years and was its labor and workplace reporter from 1995 to 2014. He is the author of The Big Squeeze: Tough Time for the American Worker, and his new book, Beaten Down, Worked Up: The Past, Present, and Future of American Labor, will be published next year. 

Recent Articles

SeaWorld's and Kavanaugh’s Missing Empathy Gene

The Supreme Court nominee showed more concern for overregulation than worker safety in a U.S. Court of Appeals case involving the death of a whale trainer.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, listens to a question on the third day of his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill W hile the nation focuses on Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations against Brett Kavanaugh, let’s not forget his judicial record. Kavanugh’s opinion in a case involving a SeaWorld employee whom an orca whale pulled into the water and killed is a remarkable document. It’s remarkable because Kavanaugh shows far less sympathy to the whale trainer who was dismembered and killed than he shows to SeaWorld for being the victim of what he sees as government overregulation and overreach. While we’ve heard much about Kavanaugh being a nice guy who coaches a girls’ basketball team, he, at least in his SeaWorld opinion, seemed to lack an empathy gene. Kavanaugh was so fixated on a subject that preoccupies him—government regulation (or should we say overregulation)—that he hardly focused on the...

What Does the Tax Bill Do for Low-Income Workers?

Basically, nothing. But will that be sufficient to peel away voters?

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a news conference in the Capitol where GOP senators said families and small businesses would benefit from tax reform. Appearing behind him are, from left, Senators Mike Rounds, Thom Tillis, David Perdue, John Barrasso, and Steve Daines. I magine a low-wage worker, perhaps one who voted for Donald Trump. This worker is getting nothing from the huge Trump-GOP tax plan. This worker won’t benefit from phasing out the estate tax. Nor will this worker gain from eliminating the Alternate Minimum Tax or from reducing the business pass-through tax from 39.6 percent to 25 percent. And because working class people can’t afford to invest in stocks or mutual funds, they won’t be among the lucky folks who receive bigger dividend checks after the corporate income tax is cut from 35 percent to 20 percent. This worker toils hard day after day, juggling two kids and a job that pays just above the minimum wage. She...

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